If at all it wasn’t already, Netflix’s familiar “dun dun” sound is now a pretty popular and recognizable tune after the streaming service witnessed growth in userbase following the pandemic-induced lockdowns. The sound can be heard ahead of Netflix’s original movies and series. However, Netflix recently decided that the traditional dune didn’t make the dramatic cut needed for the big screen.

Netflix hence now has a brand new theme made especially for theatrical releases. The maker of the new 16-second score is none other than popular composer Hans Zimmer, the man behind the score of some award-winning films including Inception and the Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight trilogy.

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The idea behind the new tune was to create a score that people would connect with instantly over time. Think of the instant connection formed every time we hear the 20th Century Fox score in the cinema. However, the new score needed here had to be something that carried the Netflix vibe. At 16 seconds, the new intro isn’t the longest one but is certainly bigger than the old Netflix tune. Not being too long also fits into the Netflix OTT mantra in an age where people want their content shown immediately.

“First off, and arguably most important, it had to be really short,” Todd Yellin, vice president of product at Netflix, said as per a report by The Verge. “In our age of click and play, you get to Netflix, you want to be able to click, and there’s no patience, you just want to get to what you’re watching.”

Netflix in cinemas will target a wider audience

The platform had launched its short “dum dum” sound just 5 years ago. Since then, the streaming service has seen tremendous growth. Now adapting to the big screen would open up many more doors for the service. People who are not really into the whole OTT idea yet will now see the potential Netflix holds for the first time in the movie theatres they usually go to.

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