South-Korean brand Samsung recently launched the Galaxy Z flip alongside the Galaxy S20 series. The brand’s second foldable smartphone features a clamshell design and promised improved hardware to make the device more durable in the long term. This was essential after the first generation Galaxy Fold devices went terribly wrong with certain design elements. The Z Flip has, however, despite its improvements, failed the infamous JerryRigEverything test on YouTube.

By the end of Zack Nelson’s testing, The Galaxy Z Flip had suffered level 2 scratches (Moh’s scale for mineral hardness) on the top layer of the UTG screen. According to GSMArena reports, the screen started showing scratches far earlier than regular glass screens.

Watch: Samsung Galaxy S10 Lite vs OnePlus 7T Pro Camera comparison

Further, the screen was already picking up level 2 damages but then started picking up damages more significantly at level 3. This is on par with the Samsung Galaxy Fold and the Moto Razr 2019. “This screen is in no way scratch-resistant whatsoever,” Nelson said at the end of the video. At the end of the clip, he could be seen poking holes in the screen that made the OLED panel go on the fritz, reported The Verge.

Galaxy Z Flip: Specifications and price

The Galaxy Z Flip smartphone flaunts a 6.7-inch Foldable Dynamic AMOLED display with FullHD+ (1080 x 2636 pixels) resolution. It also comes with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 855+ SoC paired with an Adreno 640 GPU. The device additionally has a dual-rear camera setup with a 12-megapixel primary sensor and a 12-megapixel ultrawide lens. It packs a 3,300 mAh battery with 15W fast charging support.

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip is available for $1,380 (about Rs 98,570), This makes it slightly cheaper than the Motorola Moto Razr at $1,499 (about Rs 1,07,067). The Galaxy Z Flip is still the cheapest clamshell folding smartphone out there. It also does beat its only other competitor by miles when it comes to specifications and performance. However, all that comes with a significant compromise in durability which suggests that foldable technology is still a long way from perfection.

(With inputs from IANS)

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